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The holy prophet of Islam (PBUH) as the seal of the prophets and continuation of the leadership

19 August, 2014 16:43

The main points that have been discussed are as follows:

1. What ethos are there in Islam that is comprehended as the last religion?

2. Which Divine proofs or decrees as well as narrations in the holy Quran indicate that the HolyProphet of Islam (PBUH) is the seal of the prophets?

3. How the divine leadership does not come to an end with the prophet-hood of the Holy Prophet of Islam (PBUH) as the seal of the prophets?

4. What is the ethos of the religious leaders and guardians of Islam after the Holy Prophet of Islam (PBUH)?

5. What relationship is there among the Imamate System, Divine leadership and the holy Quran? Are they separable of each other?

6. How the eternity of Islam is fulfilled through the existence of Imamate System?

 

Mr. Hodaee's speech

What the western scholars say about Prophet Mohammad (PBUH)

 Charles Stuart Mills in 'History of Mohammadanism’:

“Deeply read in the volume of nature, his mind could expand into controversy with the wisest of his enemies or contract itself to the apprehension of meanest of his disciples. His simple eloquence was rendered impressive by a manner of mixed dignity and elegance, by the expression of a countenance where the awfulness of his majesty was so well tempered by an amiable sweetness, that it exerted emotions of veneration and love. He was gifted with that authoritative air or genius which alike influences the learned and commands the illiterate.”

Washington Irving in 'Mahomet and His Successors’:

“He was sober and abstemious in his diet and a rigorous observer of fasts. He indulged in no magnificence of apparel, the ostentation of a petty mind; neither was his simplicity in dress affected but a result of real disregard for distinction from so trivial a source. “

“In his private dealings he was just. He treated friends and strangers, the rich and poor, the powerful and weak, with equity, and was beloved by the common people for the affability with which he received them, and listened to their complaints.”

George Bernard Shaw, THE GENUINE ISLAM:

“I have always held the religion of Muhammad in high estimation because of its wonderful vitality. It is the only religion which appears to me to possess that assimilating capacity to the changing phase of existence which can make itself appeal to every age. I have studied him - the wonderful man and in my opinion far from being an anti-Christ, he must be called the Savior of Humanity. I believe that if a man like him were to assume the dictatorship of the modern world, he would succeed in solving its problems in a way that would bring it the much needed peace and happiness: I have prophesied about the faith of Muhammad that it would be acceptable to the Europe of tomorrow as it is beginning to be acceptable to the Europe of today.”

John William Draper, M.D., L.L.D., A History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, London 1875, Vol.1, pp.329-330:

“Four years after the death of Justinian, A.D. 569, was born at Mecca, in Arabia the man who of all men exercised the greatest influence upon the human race... Mohammed.”

Annie Besant, THE LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF MUHAMMAD, Madras, 1932, p. 4. :

It is impossible for anyone who studies the life and character of the great Prophet of Arabia, who knows how he taught and how he lived, to feel anything but reverence for that mighty Prophet, one of the great messengers of the Supreme. And although in what I put to you I shall say many things which may be familiar to many, yet I myself feel whenever I re-read them, a new way of admiration, a new sense of reverence for that mighty Arabian teacher.”

Mahatma Gandhi, statement published in 'Young India,'1924:

“I wanted to know the best of the life of one who holds today an undisputed sway over the hearts of millions of mankind.... I became more than ever convinced that it was not the sword that won a place for Islam in those days in the scheme of life. It was the rigid simplicity, the utter self-effacement of the Prophet, the scrupulous regard for pledges, his intense devotion to his friends and followers, his intrepidity, his fearlessness, his absolute trust in God and in his own mission. These and not the sword carried everything before them and surmounted every obstacle. When I closed the second volume (of the Prophet's biography), I was sorry there was not more for me to read of that great life.”

Lane-Poole in 'Speeches and Table Talk of the Prophet Muhammad':

“He was the most faithful protector of those he protected, the sweetest and most agreeable in conversation. Those who saw him were suddenly filled with reverence; those who came near him loved him; they who described him would say, "I have never seen his like either before or after." He was of great taciturnity, but when he spoke it was with emphasis and deliberation, and no one could forget what he said...”

Washington Irving in 'Life of Muhammad,' New York, 1920:

“His military triumphs awakened neither pride nor vain glory as they would have done had they been effected by selfish purposes. In the time of his greatest power he maintained the same simplicity of manner and appearance as in the days of his adversity. So far from affecting regal state, he was displeased if, on entering a room, any unusual testimonial of respect was shown to him.”

Thomas Carlyle in 'Heroes and Hero Worship and the Heroic in History,' 1840:

“A silent great soul, one of that who cannot but be earnest; He was to kindle the world, the world’s Maker had ordered so.”

Gibbon in 'The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire' 1823:

“The good sense of Muhammad despised the pomp of royalty. The Apostle of God submitted to the menial offices of the family; he kindled the fire; swept the floor; milked the ewes; and mended with his own hands his shoes and garments. Disdaining the penance and merit of a hermit, he observed without effort of vanity the abstemious diet of an Arab.”

Taylor in 'The History of Muhammadanism and its Sects':

“So great was his liberality to the poor that he often left his household unprovided, nor did he content himself with relieving their wants, he entered into conversation with them, and expressed a warm sympathy for their sufferings. He was a firm friend and a faithful ally.”

Reverend Bosworth Smith in 'Muhammad and Muhammadanism,' London, 1874:

“He was Caesar and Pope in one; but he was Pope without the Pope's pretensions and Caesar without the legions of Caesar, without a standing army, without a bodyguard, without a police force, without a fixed revenue. If ever a man ruled by a right divine, it was Muhammad, for he had all the powers without their supports. He cared not for the dressings of power. The simplicity of his private life was in keeping with his public life.”

Dr. Gustav Weil in 'History of the Islamic Peoples':

“Muhammad was a shining example to his people. His character was pure and stainless. His house, his dress, his food - they were characterized by a rare simplicity. So unpretentious was he that he would receive from his companions no special mark of reverence, nor would he accept any service from his slave which he could do for himself. He was accessible to all and at all times. He visited the sick and was full of sympathy for all. Unlimited was his benevolence and generosity as also was his anxious care for the welfare of the community.”

Alphonse de LaMartaine in 'Historie de la Turquie,' Paris, 1854:

“If greatness of purpose, smallness of means, and astonishing results are the three criteria of a human genius, who could dare compare any great man in history with Muhammad? The most famous men created arms, laws, and empires only. They founded, if anything at all, no more than material powers which often crumbled away before their eyes. This man moved not only armies, legislations, empires, peoples, dynasties, but millions of men in one-third of the then inhabited world; and more than that, he moved the altars, the gods, the religions, the ideas, the beliefs and the souls.”

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Date : Sunday August 20, 2006, 17:30-19:30 (+3.5 GMT) PM (Tehran local time) 
Place : Third Floor, Kanoon Islami Ansar Library, Gordafarid St., Next to Amir (AS) Mosque, Across the gas station, North Kargar St., Tehran-Iran.

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